Building a three-headed monster

Yesterday I posted on Third Friday, a monthly event that’s become so successful that it spawned a similar spin-off called First Saturday and may have pushed downtown redevelopment over the hump. Similarly, there are some new businesses and apartments going up on the northern edge of the city along U.S. 13, and even the venerable Centre of Salisbury – venerable as a 27-year-old mall can be, I suppose – has the promise of something Salisbury has longed for, a Cracker Barrel restaurant. It’s slated to be built in the parking lot outside the abandoned J.C. Penney store. (Shoot, I was happy when Buffalo Wild Wings finally made it here from Ohio.)

But there is one prime area that has all the ingredients needed for success – plenty of traffic, good visibility, and reliable city utilities. Yet it sits vacant and unused because its plans for development came along at a bad time.

Several years ago, before my unplanned exile from the building industry, I helped draw up a proposed project which would have established a third attraction for Salisbury. Obviously we know the Centre of Salisbury was a retail destination point and at the time the downtown area was being discussed as something which, as it turns out, it is in the process of becoming – a place where visual and performing arts serves as the draw, along with a handful of local eateries.

But the plot of land just south of Perdue Stadium had its own node, with a guaranteed gathering of anywhere from 500 hardy, weather-tested souls to overflow crowds of over 8,000 people 60 to 65 times a year during the spring and summer. Add in the thousands of travelers driving by and there was the potential for a destination of its own; close enough to the beach to be a viable alternative for budget-concious travelers looking for something with a slower pace, yet with the attractions to enjoy a summer evening without the need for driving around.

As originally envisioned, the development had several key elements for success: office space for workday usage, restaurants for both travelers and those seeking a place to have a business or casual lunch, and lodging for those who wanted to have an anchor point to explore the area yet not have to deal with beach crowds. Its misfortune was beginning the development process at a time when we were entering the Great Recession of 2007-whenever. (Some may argue the area is still in one based on employment numbers.)

One other proposal envisioned for the site was the construction of a new Civic Center on the opposite side of the Perdue Stadium parking lot. Besides the obvious plentiful parking available, a new Civic Center would have the advantages of making beer sales at events possible (a deed restriction for the property of the current Wicomico Youth and Civic Center prohibits alcohol sales as a condition of having it donated to the county for its use) and could be configured for more seating than the current arena to attract larger acts.

Any action on that, however, is several years to a decade away. Yet the county is putting money into 20-year-old Perdue Stadium and the owners of the Delmarva Shorebirds are committing themselves to another two decades as the station’s prime tenant. In short, the main attractions aren’t going anywhere.

Yet this valuable land sits as a part of Salisbury time and economics seemingly forgot.

I understand the emphasis our city fathers have placed on revitalizing downtown and trying to make it a close-by gathering place for both young professionals and Salisbury University students. With a transit system already in place to ferry students from campus to downtown several nights a week and grand plans to spruce up the Business Route 13 corridor from SU to the east edge of downtown, city visionaries and elected officials have it covered. Meanwhile, the part of town encompassing the Centre of Salisbury up toward Delmar seems to be doing just fine although admittedly some of that retail may be getting long in the tooth and due for upgrades. The closing of J.C. Penney was just another pockmark on a facility which may need its own transformation in the next decade lest it suffer the fate of the old Salisbury Mall it replaced.

But that rebirth can be set on the back burner for now. Downtown development may be the place where the cool kids go, but there are other assets Salisbury can put in play with the proper foresight and investment. Imagine what could be there now if things had proceeded a decade ago, and work to make it a reality in the next few years. The infrastructure is already there thanks to the aborted previous plans, so let’s get this diamond in the rough to shine.

Comments

2 Responses to “Building a three-headed monster”

  1. swampcritter2 on June 20th, 2015 9:04 pm

    This piece of property if I’m not mistaken is owned at the present time by a local contractor. Several years ago he had intentions of constructing a business park at that location, but abandoned the idea after seeing how many hurdles he had to clear. These hurdles were imposed upon him by the state, the county and the city.
    I agree the property is a diamond in the rough. It could be a major venue for events. It is, as you say ideally located. My thoughts on it were more along the lines of relocating the hospital to that site. That may seem radical, but Salisbury can only go in one direction now, and that direction is east. There would be ample room for structure and parking (something local developers love to overlook) By relocating the hospital there emergency vehicles would have access to the nexus of two major highways and not have to negotiate the drive into the center of town. This could save time and lives. The site is close to many satellite health facilities also. Tear down the old Civic center, build a new one on the same site. Close Glen Avenue down between Civic and Beaglin Park. Put in a small park and construct a sports facility/stadium on the site of the old mall. Include parking! This could encompass all the land from Civic to Beaglin Park Dr. St. Albans would be gone but so what?
    I could tell you what to do with the site where PRMC sits presently also. These ideas of mine are no crazier than anyone else’s. I think they’re pretty far reaching, but are within the realm of the do-able. Look at the landscape and the demographics and you will see I am at least right on one thing and that is Salisbury is moving eastward. Time to get the jump on things for a change.

  2. A new Day in Salisbury? : monoblogue on July 8th, 2015 11:34 pm

    […] of downtown. Certainly downtown development has a place in the city’s renewal but there are other avenues worth considering […]

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