monoblogue music: “Legends In Their Own Minds” by Sundogs

You almost get two albums for the price of one with this new collection from the Seattle-based duo and friends known as Sundogs: out of twelve songs, about half would feel at home in the jazz-rock fusion landscape most famously populated by Steely Dan and the other half would lie squarely in the somewhat Southern, somewhat country, somewhat guitar-driven frontier of music bordered by the Eagles and Tom Petty. (In fact, to me the opening song Fallen Hero sounded like a Petty outtake except the Heartbreakers didn’t use electric piano like this song does.)

If they had been smart (or if it ever comes out in vinyl or cassette) they’d have done this sort of like G N’ R Lies but instead of live vs. acoustic it would be jazz fusion vs. classic rock. On the jazz side you’d have Snowman, which has a Santana-style opening, Did It Really Happen – sort of the title track as it has the lyrical reference – Castle, and End Of The World to close the side. I would be inclined to slide the instrumental Intro and Sahara as the fourth and fifth songs on that side to even up the sides. Not a perfect fit, but it would work.

I found that lyrically Snowman and Did It Really Happen were a little bit flawed and that Castle and End Of The World seemed quite alike. (In reality they are almost opposite on the album as tracks 2 and 12.) Intro/Sahara is a quite pleasant acoustic track.

And then you have side B, which is the rocker side. We could take that opener Fallen Hero and back it up with the potential singles Alive Tonight and Already Gone. (Yes, the title is the same but it’s not a remake.) Smart people might put those on the chart. Then could come the serious country rock of Hope and ballad Land Of Broken Dreams.

That leaves Johnny, which is an interesting song both lyrically and in its setup – it’s almost like two songs because the story is over about 2/3 of the way through a five-minute flat song, and a sort of funkified country lick shifts into a keyboard bridge. (They repeat the chorus on the outro but most of the last 90 seconds is instrumental.)

It also makes for an interesting video. Can you tell they had fun with green screens?

Someday I’m going to figure out what small town played host to the long motion shot. It’s like Google Maps street view without moving the mouse.

As far as the Sundogs band is concerned, it’s really two guys – guitarist Stan Snow and keyboard player Jed Moffitt. They play on all the tracks, but studio musicians from around the Seattle region fill in the other parts. If I hadn’t read it, though, I wouldn’t have known it by how the album was produced.

It’s a rule of mine, though, that you shouldn’t take my word for it. On this one you can check out their website and listen for yourself. You may find something you like in the vast variety.

monoblogue music: Versal (self-titled EP)

Sometimes in life things occur in an order for a reason. A couple weeks back I had a free Saturday so I decided to address the backlog I had of records to review. And after going through two records which were outside my genre and very complex to the point of being a little bit overbearing, I sat down and listened to this six-song instrumental EP and really appreciated its simplicity.

That’s not to say the EP is one-dimensional at all. In fact, the six songs are all done via the efforts of Houston-based and Puerto Rican native musician Javier Velez, who uses Versal as a professional name, but they are layered in such a way that makes this collection an enjoyable listen and a respite – even if it, too, is outside my preferred genre. Some of the tracks, especially the opener Eternal, made me wish a Christian artist would write devotional lyrics to Versal’s music. I bet it would work.

If I really wanted to be nit-picky I would say that the second track, Flamenco en Culebra, is a touch too long – otherwise the songs fit rather neatly into the four-minute timeframe that works well for most music. But overall this is a very fine collection of songs that may appeal to a wide range of discerning listeners.

In reading a little bit on Velez, he claims to be something of a child prodigy who mastered five instruments by the age of 17 and picked up three more since. But his day job led him to the film making and visual world, making this EP something which was on his bucket list until he finally found time to complete it over the last couple years. There are actually two more songs he’s envisioning, but he wanted to get these out for some unknown reason.

Anyway, if the other two come out soon it will be a blessing – in the meantime I encourage you to enjoy the original six and listen for yourself. It would soothe the savage beast.

monoblogue music: “Ten Years of Solitude” by Alya

There are some things in life I just don’t get. This is an album that is nominated for an award (the Independent Music Awards, which is a thing since this year’s is the 17th annual) and, on top of that, it has a video for Heart Shaped Hole that has been played over 3 million times on Youtube. (Once I get past the break for the photo I’ll embed the video, which is rather well-done to be honest.)

So why didn’t I like it, feeling that it was way too oversampled, overdramatic, and just plain fussy? (That and I really hate album covers that deface a face, so to speak.)

Maybe it goes with an artistic vision that I, a simple guy who spent his formative years watching corn grow in rural northwest Ohio, can’t figure out for the life of me. But it has pretty pictures and colors.

When I listened to it on Bandcamp, one of the sub-genres listed for it was “experimental pop” and maybe that’s the best description. Heart Shaped Hole is one of those experiments which succeeds, as well as Puppet Strings and Angel. Romano is an interesting song but I don’t know Japanese to understand the lyrics – ironically, it’s a song performed the least in Alya’s breathy singing style. That way of singing – admittedly, it’s been pulled off on a regular basis in the music industry – is what makes songs like Animals and Seven miss the mark.

The amount of experimentation in the songs seems to dictate how well they work. If the song is simple, like the ballad Hachiko, it comes off all right. But placing the vocals too far under the music as is done on Half of the Sun, or making Twenty Six a the song that made me think of the “fussy and overdramatic” description – well, that doesn’t work. Truly, I was relieved when the “let’s throw a lot of stuff at the wall and see what sticks” closing song Colorful Dreams came to an end because I was finished sitting through this.

Done with her vocals and a single producer, who presumably did all of the instrumentation, I think Alya’s vision for what was apparently a project long in the works just doesn’t match up with mine. It may match up with yours, though, so if you don’t mind Spotify you can judge for yourself.

There are fewer pretty colors there, though.

monoblogue music: “It’s Time” by Rose Ann Dimalanta Trio

I suppose It’s Time for me to do another music review. (See what I did there?)

However, I really shouldn’t make light of this serious effort by a musical veteran who spent nearly two decades in the business, building her brand to the point of having her very own fan club. And I can see why she had one, given a fairly sultry and smoky voice that goes well with some of the selections she wrote and placed on this album. It was an album which came about as those I review often do: songwriting ideas bounced off a friend who liked them and enlisted help in making them a reality.

Since I don’t consider myself to be either a fan or maven of the jazz genre she’s staked her position in, I have to grade Rose Ann’s trio on some of the things I found memorable in the album. Sometimes they aren’t so good, such as the bass line on the lead song Forever Day By Day that sounded just a little off somehow, the odd percussion runs on Latin Soul, or the cloying string session on Miles, the second single from an album that is actually nearly six months old as I review it.

But “It’s Time” has some good points going for it: the imaginative improvisation of 10 Miles To Empty, the intriguing lyrical turn in Happily’s Never After, or the dash of funk that made Mad Run an enjoyable tune, to name a few. Truly Love Someone counts in that regard as a duet, although I wasn’t quite sure if it were a statement in featuring another female singer.

Another interesting facet I’d not heard or thought of before was that of using voice as instrument: a unique and nonsensical chorus briefly comes into play on the otherwise instrumental (and aforementioned) Latin Soul as well as on Seven Days. Since these come into play toward the middle of the song and aren’t part of a lyric line, I count it as adding another instrument to the mix to go with the basic bass, drums, and keyboards on the album. (The rather unique cover features the names of the trio: Raymond McKinley is the bassist and Massimo Buonanno is the drummer as Dimalanta plays keyboards.)

If I were to categorize this one, though, it would be somewhere between the hard jazz of Dinner For One (at over seven minutes, it’s the longest track on the album) and the old “middle of the road” radio format that Measure Of A Man and That’s All could easily fit into. It’s not something I would listen to every day – I’m definitely a fish out of water when it comes to that style – but it’s well-done enough to be enjoyable to a certain segment of the population that’s simply not into current popular music and likes something with gravitas.

As I generally do, though, I’ll let you be the judge (via Spotify.) If you like it, then it’s time to add Rose Ann Dimalanta to your collection.

monoblogue music: “Words For Yesterday” by Benny Bassett

This may be one of the best, simplest, yet most descriptive album covers I’ve reviewed yet. (And yes, the music is pretty good, too.)

On April 12, you can get your hands on the forthcoming EP from the guy in the photo, who gets assistance from some solid backing musicians and harmony singing to put together what could be described as a musical smorgasbord. While Bassett would probably fit best in the singer-songwriter mold, the six songs on the EP have a variety of sounds to them.

The reason I said “descriptive” for the album cover is that the first two songs on the EP – songs which would be at home on an album by any number of classic artists like The Eagles, John Cougar Mellencamp, or Tom Petty, to name a few – evoke just the imagery that the cover does. Just the names alone – Window To Forever and Live Where You Love The Sky – create that vibe. Bassett’s roaming ways provide the backdrop to the video he did for the latter song, images that represent 40 stops along his way over the last year.

But just when you thought you had Benny pegged, he gets much heavier with my pick for the best song of the six, Down Below. Yet that’s not the last twist as he gets a little more bluesy with Find A Way. That’s another winner, as is the final ballad From You. The only song I have a bit of objection to is the slightly cheesy penultimate song, Building A Future. It is a romantic song of sorts, though, so it does have that going for it. Somewhere someone would love that song for a wedding.

Benny now calls Albuquerque home, but his real base of operation seems to be his SUV. Describing himself as “a solo troubadour,” Bassett has done hundreds of shows over the few years since Vintage Blue, a former band he was in, parted ways. With that breakup, Benny left the legal game (he’s a recovering attorney – my words, not his) and his former Chicago home behind. Interestingly enough, the Wikipedia page for Vintage Blue claims they played shows “from Los Angeles all the way to Ocean City, Maryland and everywhere in between.” (Stick with me on this one.)

That touring expertise and willingness to go play shows means that Bassett already has a post-album tour lined up; however, that just seems to be the extension of his pre-album tour he’s on now. April sees him playing in twelve states (so far), with everything from house parties to hotel appearances on the docket.

And I suppose one line from Benny’s review of 2018 immediately established a connection with me: he “grew (his) relationship with Aloft Hotels all over North America.” In fact, there are three he’s playing on his April tour: Bentonville, Minneapolis, and Detroit. That connection? It just so happens that there’s an Aloft soon to open in Ocean City – I know because my “real” employer designed it and I came in on the tail end of the drafting work. So perhaps Benny will be coming our way later this summer. (Wonder if he gets to stay free?)

Normally I would tell you at this point not to take my word for it, but to listen for yourself. Unfortunately, aside from the song video I put up I can’t steer you to a place to hear it. My advice: keep his social media page in mind for April 12 and that may provide some guidance.

monoblogue music: “A New Heart” by the Kevin Thomas Band

If you are ever out San Diego way, you might just run into Kevin Thomas. Just look for the upbeat guy enjoying life with the positive vibes.

There are ten tracks on his album, which has already hit the streets. (You can get a reasonably good taste of the style and vibe from the first single, The Big Picture. That is, if you don’t mind Spotify too much.)

In reading his bio, I came across a line that put his album into better focus for me.

On that fateful evening, influenced by the energy that it was also his birthday, he was previously at another club watching a heavy, angst-ridden band play. There he found that it was almost as if his soul was rejecting the music being played. He soon left the club and found himself in another club soaking up an artist performing with just an acoustic guitar, his songs, and his voice. “I noticed then that different vibrations of music can have either harmful or life-enhancing effects on the body and mind, that certain sounds can actually help you evolve spiritually.” he says. The path to A New Heart had begun.

from Kevin Thomas’s website bio.

I don’t think there’s a drop of angst in this one. And as Kevin is a longtime songwriter I can’t complain at all about the musical writing skills or the arrangements, which range from the more pop-styled Money Tree, Let Your Arrow Fly, and Mirror Mirror to the more jazz-funk Time and an upbeat track like Comfort Zone.

But there are some more hidden gems and quirks awaiting listeners as well: the intriguing opening and a cappella bridges of Reinvent Yourself, a more midtempo On My Way Out, and closer The Best Luck Around prove Kevin has more than one gear.

The only real complaint I have – and perhaps this is a matter of vocal taste – is that I don’t think Kevin has the voice to always carry out his intentions. The unevenness is what keeps a good song like the initial single The Big Picture from being a great song, yet songs that frame his voice well like the sort of Sublime-like High On Chocolate become the best ones on the album. Yet I could still imagine an Ocean City bar loving The Big Picture with its Caribbean flavor, so your mileage may vary.

As you may know, I tell people to listen for themselves. The piece of information I was given was that the album would be available March 29, but it appears he already has the music and availability on his band website. So I would go check that out if you like something in a more pop-rock edging slightly toward classic rock vein.

monoblogue music: “The Starman” (single/video) by Lord Sonny the Unifier

This is going to be a “value-added” review. I was originally asked to write on the single and video in the title, which this Brooklyn-based band put out back on February 8. However, one of the links was to the advance review copy of the album that The Starman is featured on, called “Final Notice!” So I’m going to talk about that a little bit, in part because The Starman is very representative of the collection as a whole.

Like I said, the video and single came out last month and, rather than make you deal with Spotify I’ll just embed the video for your viewing pleasure. It’s the same song.

The second single and video from the forthcoming release “Final Notice!” by Lord Sonny the Unifier.

Trust me, this video is nowhere near as weird as their first one from the album, the initial single Right In Your I.

But if you didn’t get the vibe from the latest video – which, admittedly, needs a lot of explanation to allow me to “get it” – you might correctly imagine this album would almost have been more at home dropping in 1979 than 2019. Strangely enough, the influential records listed by the band for their forthcoming full-length are smack dab representative of that album rock era.

I can hear a lot of those influences – or at least the ones that I know, since I haven’t listened to every track therein – on “Final Notice!”, which I believe is slated to come out in mid-April. And I have to say that, while all the songs are different enough to hold your interest, there’s really not a bad one in the bunch. Obviously there are some I like better than others, such as First In Space and March Forth (the latter really should be released to the world on Monday, naturally) but they all are pretty enjoyable in their own right. And the cool thing is that they can use 2019 technology now to make 1979 sound even better.

Now if you believe the backstory to this album – and after watching their videos there are a couple doubts creeping into my mind, but we’ll go ahead and roll with it – this band was a successor project for lead singer Greg Jiritano after he a) did a 6-year “extreme sonic experimentation” with a collaborator and band that produced music which couldn’t be performed live and went unreleased, and b) decided after plan A didn’t pan out to do a DIY project only to have the studio burn to the ground shortly before its release, destroying all of his work. So you are listening to plan C, which may very well be a good name for a band or album. (The rest of the Unifier band: Tyler Wood on keyboards, Derek Nievergelt on bass, and drummer Carmine Covelli. With a name like that, he had to be a drummer.)

Given the subtle but pleasing strangeness of Lord Sonny the Unifier and their album from another era, I can’t say plan C wasn’t the correct play.

monoblogue music: “Jammin’ With Juma” by Rich Lerner and the Groove (featuring Juma Sultan)

This is another review of a monoblogue music alumni, and it’s an album that was a long time in the making.

You may recall back in January, when I followed up on my previous top 5’s, that Rich had been in the studio over the early part of 2018 but “the trail (seemed) to have grown cold.” This review is the bloodhound regaining the scent.

As it turned out, this album came out at the back end of 2018 but rather quietly, considering the album release party didn’t occur until just a couple weeks ago. And Juma was there: Juma Sultan is a longtime percussionist whose initial claim to fame was sharing the Woodstock stage with Jimi Hendrix. That bloodline is immediately set forth on the album’s first track, Hey Baby (New Rising Sun), which was a song Hendrix wrote and performed.

I can’t say whether The Groove’s version is as good as the original because it’s not a Hendrix track I’m familiar with. What I can say is that, if I didn’t know it was a remake, I’d be digging it anyway as a seriously good jam.

It’s not a music video in the true sense, but the audio is pretty cool and sets the tone for Lerner’s latest release.

“Jammin’ With Juma” is a good mixture of covers that I knew and some variant of the following: covers which were so obscure that a Google search couldn’t dig them up, or stuff that Rich had kept in his back pocket. In the category of covers I knew you can place the old Eric Burdon song Spill The Wine and a song originally by Freddie Scott and redone by a solo Ron Wood called Am I Grooving You? (That one came via Rich’s song listing on his band’s website.) The remake of Wine starts out a little shaky but improves as it goes, while the take on Grooving is that of a more straight-ahead rock song placed on a sea of very psychedelic relics and jams.

There are two other songs on here that are only done once. I honestly thought Ghosts of Jimi was also a cover, but the other song that has a similar title isn’t the same track. Too bad for it, because The Groove made this song into a jam band tune with very catchy lyrics. Similarly, Paranoia Blues isn’t the version Paul Simon made famous: instead, this one has a large Tom Petty influence with a really cool outro.

I say “only done once” because the final two tracks on “Jammin’ With Juma” are reworked versions of two previous songs. Be Here Now is already a strangely successful interplay of a hint of dub music (lots of echo) with some country overtones. I noted on the original play (it’s track number three on the record) that it had a good jam band potential but seemed rushed to finish – well, the producer picked it up with a reprise in track eight for an extra minute and a half to a more satisfactory close.

The other example is track two: the heavily reggae Seven Sunsets, which is nicely done except for being a touch weak on the vocals. On the last track this one is really dubbed out and (naturally) rechristened Sunset Dub (Head Mix). The song is definitely made different by the effects.

But as I generally say, you’re the best judge of what’s good to your ears so feel free to listen for yourself. I know I liked this one a lot, and although it’s waaaaaay too early to consider this year’s top 5 I can see “Jammin’ With Juma” being a contender.

monoblogue music: “Elise” by Damon Mitchell

This one is so new they haven’t even finished the cover art for it. I’m told this is the cover photo for (presumably) a debut EP by a 22-year-old artist from my old neck of the woods, Fort Wayne, Indiana.

Damon Mitchell has a 6-song EP ready for release on March 2, so I’ve listened to the tracks but they’re still under wraps except for the title track, which is the lead single and video I’ll feature in a short bit below. Perhaps it’s a good thing Elise is the last in line but the first song out of the chute because it’s the best and most accessible tune on the album. (Saving the best for last?) I’m not so sure about the video, though, although we also learn that Mitchell is a southpaw when it comes to playing.

The lead single and title track to Damon Mitchell’s forthcoming EP, coming out March 2.

As Damon is a rather young musician, it helps to explain why his style is all over the place on this one. As presented in my preview, the leadoff song Heist is a Beatle-influenced ode to a pop era gone by, although he freshens up the genre and makes it a rather enjoyable song.

Damon slows things down with the ballad Just A Face, which begins to expose a few of the cracks in the facade. Some of the vocals on this one aren’t quite up to snuff, particularly when Damon tries to hit the higher notes. Shaping songs to his voice is something he’ll surely learn as time goes on.

License Plate is more of a country or bluegrass turn, with the addition of fiddle and harmonica. (In the credits there are a total of 12 musicians listed for the six-song EP, so Mitchell had plenty of help.) The problem with this song to me was the way the lyrical runs played out – again, practice and experience will help the cause here.

If you’re waiting on an adult contemporary song, you’ll find the music on the song Salo but the lyrics don’t really evoke romance. Aside from a clever reference to The Weight by The Band, I really didn’t care for the lyrics on Salo at all. They seemed stilted and forced. Maybe this is a song he revisits later on, using the riff to write something better.

Damon turns even more to the jazzy side of things with World In Her Eyes. But again the weakness in the song comes from the lyrics and singing. Completing the circle back to the vibe of Heist but going a couple notches heavier is the title track, which has as its coda some solid guitar work.

So while there are obvious flaws in this six-song EP, they are definitely fixable for the next time, and it’s likely a little bit of experience will help Mitchell work some of these issues out. I don’t mind complex or unconventional lyrics at all, but they need a special amount of talent to be done just right. Once Damon figures out his strengths and writes music in such a way to maximize them, he could do all right for himself. He’s just not quite there yet.

Since he has several shows lined up in the Indiana region (coming as close as Pittsburgh for a gig this spring) I think Damon will get some practice in. On March 2 you’ll see what I mean.

monoblogue music: “Spark” by Todd Warner Moore

This was one of the hardest reviews I had to write, and it wasn’t really because I lost the original draft of it on my phone. Rather, this was one that I couldn’t categorize because there wasn’t a pigeonhole I could place Moore’s music in to make my life easier. It could be the various influences of place: Moore is a Kansas native who’s traveled the globe and now makes his home in the unlikely musical hotbed of Hong Kong.

He’s also a prolific musician as this was his second full-length solo album of 2018, after June’s “Lapis Lazuli.” But Moore cut his teeth on the college circuit as part of an acoustic group two decades ago, later creating an “expat” band called Tea Thieves when he lived in Hungary. I’ll come back to them in a bit, but first I’ll talk about the issues I had with “Spark.”

Moore’s album is one with some serious storytelling, as I found when I listened to the album on the Bandcamp website, which features the lyrics for most of the songs. As far as that goes, it’s fine, but the problem I ran into was that his actual music is like the frame to a painting; put another way, he has an album which reminds the listener of the background music that plays while the movie’s dialogue continues. If you set aside the brief spoken Prologue and Epilogue you still have 12 songs that are densely filled with lyrics that range from the thought-provoking to the obtuse – oftentimes within the space of two lines. As most of the songs are done without instrumental bridges – thus clocking at no more than four minutes, and often under three – it’s so much so that the music is not even noticed.

I’m going to use an example of both thought-provoking and obtuse here. This song is called Noodles.

A track off Todd Warner Moore’s “Spark” album.

To hear Moore tell it, he says, “Apologies can be difficult.  Sometimes we express them through our actions and not necessarily our words.  When we cook, we transform raw ingredients into something new and wonderful.  In this song, underneath a simple recipe lies an apology with the hope of transformation.” Or maybe it’s just four-dimensional chess. To me this was one of the worst offenders of being trite and obtuse.

I mentioned the band Tea Thieves earlier. Tucked away at the end of “Spark” is a bonus track he did with the band called The Lens. The fact that it’s far and away the best song on the album to me tells me that maybe the band needs to come back together. Sadly, it’s the fourteen tracks of basically bland filler that came before that left the impression. But I’ll link again to Bandcamp if you want to listen (and judge) for yourself.

monoblogue music: “Sum Of All Parts” by Mark Peters and The Dark Band

This will turn out to be a second (and longer) helping from a monoblogue music alumnus – I reviewed a single from a previous EP last year – although at this point in time only the title track is available for listening or watching as a video. (The remainder of the four-song package is slated to come out this coming Monday, January 28.)

So how about the “Sum Of All Parts” as an album? Well, the title track seemed like a cynical look at a relationship but turned out to have a happy ending. It’s a very accessible pop song that should find a lot of interest if the radio industry will allow it. That’s backed up by the acoustic open to Failure Is My Friend, which turns out to be a bouncy, almost country-feeling entry into the adult-contemporary field.

The weakest song is Bone Dry – while it has nice slow-to-fast transitions that I liked, the most annoying part is hearing (loudly) the fingering of chord changes on the acoustic guitar. It makes the song seem underproduced and not thought through for some reason. (Otherwise, Mark had the sense to use Dan Fisher of Audio Heart Records – the label this will be released on – as his producer for his second EP after doing so on “Spirits.”)

The closing track of Highs And Lows is a good closer to the collection, blending a touch of country-rock in with his continental sound. It works well with his voice and probably will be a popular tune when Mark embarks on a six-week run of live appearances around his current home in Austria, a tour that will also have a lengthy run in Germany.

Aside from the modern-day marketing strategy of releasing just a few songs at once as an EP rather than the old days of 10- or 12-song albums with a handful intended as singles and the rest there to fill out the record, Mark reminds me of a ’70’s throwback in sound and feel. (Younger members of Gen X and Millennials – let alone any of my Gen Z readers – will have to go find a ’70’s pop music channel and listen for a couple hours to notice the arrangements and styles are distinct from those prevalent a decade earlier or later, let alone nearly a half-century now.) Maybe it was a little different in Europe, but either way Mark seems to me a 1970’s throwback – he even has a little of that look, but fortunately not the awful style of dress – and it’s Saturday. (Regarding those ’70’s styles: trust me, none of my late elementary to junior high pictures are going on Facebook.)

But when this comes out Monday – and assuming Mark quickly adds that to the title single that’s already on Spotify, although he has a very nice website, too – those who like the sort of station “you can listen to at work” because it has the sort of music that’s honest and not just about beats and bass should give this a chance. And who knows? If there’s enough interest, maybe he’ll give this side of the pond a go.

monoblogue music: “Wasted Time” by Future Thrills

After nearly five years of trying, this is the first time I have had the opportunity to review local music. And considering this exercise was instituted in no small part from my long-running “Weekend of local rock” series, it’s amazing that it took over a hundred reviews before I did one where I could easily see the band in person.

So back in late December I was minding my own business and perusing my e-mail box when up popped an e-mail press release from this band. I suspect I’m on their mailing list because Future Thrills bassist Chris Slavens is a fellow writer who I’ve known awhile, but regardless I thought it would be a good time to add a local element to monoblogue music since part of the intent of Weekend of local rock all along was to promote area music and this is the extension.

So what did I think of this four-song EP, recorded just up the road in Baltimore? Let’s just say this package generally has the sound you would hope to hear in an up-and-coming rock band.

The opening song Believe provides a great introduction, not just to the album but to Future Thrills’ influences as well. What begins as a relatively standard-grade post-punk alternative track takes several interesting turns through tempo changes and a detour into some reggae style before wrapping itself up. They avoid falling into some of the traps that make the sound stale.

It’s not quite pulled off as well with Stuck on You, the second track and the one of the quartet that is perhaps the weakest link. The song has a good harmony to it, but seems to be more of a paint-by-numbers effort than the others.

Charging into Bide My Time, though, the band picks up steam with a little more heavy sound, although it still lies well within the range of mainstream rock. (Mainstream rock, that is, that doesn’t have the over-dependence on bass, drums, and rap influence plaguing the “active rock” genre.)

If you like the punk side of rock, the final song borrows the most from the frenetic pace from which that brand is known. Next Episode may leave you breathless, but it also leaves you wondering where the other eight or ten songs are. Given the fact Future Thrills has been together less than a year (although three of the four played together in an earlier band called Sidecar Falcon) it’s a good way to introduce themselves and a rather enjoyable way to begin the review year.

If the band is to be commended on its good music, Future Thrills should also be commended for finding a good producer (in this case a guy named Justin Day, who runs New Noise Recording), outsourcing something that often causes trouble for DIY bands who don’t have that unbiased ear to know when something just isn’t right. This is about as tightly-produced as a garage-style band can be without it affecting their sound in a negative way.

I always implore the readers to listen for themselves, but locals can go one better: Future Thrills has its EP release party on January 26 at Trader Lee’s in Ocean City. (It’s a good venue that has bittersweet memories for me.) So if you can make it out I encourage it. Support your local original music!

Next week I have the first of my regular reviews already in a queue, so it’s a busy start to 2019 for this tiny little department of monoblogue.